The Secret to Loose Leash Walking!

My secret to Loose Leash Walking!

The ultimate goal!! To have a dog who doesn’t drag you down the street! Who listens when you are tethered together. The one skill that every 6 to 8 month old puppy owner is wishing they had the magical answer for!

Somewhere I read that teaching your pup to walk on a loose leash was just the same as teaching any other trick. That clicked for me, the dog trainer, but my clients look at me like I have 3 heads. (There is that glassy look that I was talking about in my Trigger Stacking article) Follow me here!

Remember when you were teaching your pup to sit? He learned first in front of the cookie jar because jumping up at you was not a good idea. Brilliant pup! Then you moved into the living room and asked for a “sit” and got the blank stare?

Yeah that blank stare!

Dogs have a hard time generalizing what you are asking of them, unless you ask them for things in lots of different places.  Add in all the new exciting smells of the world and your puppy has no brains left to give you!

Take a look outside to the sidewalk. See all those individual squares? Those are all different places for your pup, with new smells and different experiences. That means you have to tackle a loose leash on every single one of those squares until your pup gets the idea. Don’t worry, with some consistency on your part, this will go quicker than you imagine.

Homework!

Start inside the house. Yep! Leash puppy up and walk around the kitchen then the living room and down the hallway. If there is any pulling on the leash just stop and wait for puppy to look back at you with that blank stare. Reward puppy right at your side where you would have a nice loose leash. I aim for the seam of your pants. If cookie shows up at your side, then puppy is going to want to stay at your side to get those cookies.

The other secret is to set a timer for your session. 5 mins for baby puppies, maybe 15 mins for older puppies. Heck, maybe you only have 5 mins of patience, it’s better than nothing!

Once your inside walking is great, start moving toward the door you would like to begin to go out for a walk. Same rules apply! If you feel any pulling, you stop and wait for puppy to look at you. The first time you venture out the door, you might be walking one very long step at a time, but the more consistent you are, the faster your puppy will pick up on the concept that pulling means you stop.

Set the timer! If you only make it to the mailbox in 20 mins, well, that is your pups walk for the day. Having them think about what they are doing is so much better than letting them drag you around for 20 mins. You are also one day closer to meeting your goals!

The Secret!

Practice! Sorry, I wish my magic wand worked for this one. If your pup is struggling to get down the driveway, go back to something easier like the front door. Once you turn around and go back to a place that your dog has already had the chance to investigate, then they have more brain to give you. When they walk with a nice loose leash back to the door, then tell them what a brilliant puppy they are! Feedback is so important!!

At the end of the day there are 100 different ways to reach the end result. Hopefully, this gives you some idea on how to get started!

Being sent to the principals office

Why is “going to the trainer” a bad thing? When did I become a high school principal?
I am currently working with a dog at a local daycare. I pull him out of his play group for an hour in the morning, and put him back when we are done. It’s a good set up for the things we are working on. Recently, one of the daycare staff was struggling with one of the dogs in the group, and quipped “knock it off or I’ll send you to the trainer” I chuckled because it sounded very similar to “Daniel, I am sending you to the principal’s office,”  but it milled around in my head for the rest of the morning.
I thought about the things I worked on in my day training session. We played with a new squeaky toy, got a massage, polished up some cues, and chased some cookies around the floor.
Well, now that sounds like fun! I think the dog had fun. He certainly worked hard for me, and played even harder.
I thought about my dogs training sessions at home. They are always willing to join me, and give me everything they can at that particular minute. I am respectful of how they are feeling and make sure to break any session up with a game of tug or chasing some cookies.
I know I don’t like to do things that aren’t enjoyable. If training wasn’t fun for my dog, would I have to leash them up to get them off the couch? Beg them to come out of their crate? I don’t have either of these struggles so I am thinking that what I am asking them is pretty fun.
Then I wonder why do people think that training is not fun? I know training for competition or sport is not everyone’s cup of tea but enjoying your dog should be. (Isn’t that why people get dogs?) Is it the notion that the trainer is going to make you or your dog do something they don’t think is right? Is it the idea that you or your dog will fail?
I’m not sure any of my clients have failed in their journey with their dog. They may not have reached their goals, or the dog may not have been the right fit for them, but I definitely don’t see that as a failure. I also don’t think I have ever asked them to do anything that they were not comfortable doing.

Biting on dad? How about a time out in the kennel.

Don’t want to recall from the back yard? Don’t wait for them to decide they want to come in, go get them and practice more.

Not into a tug session at 7:30am?  Me either kid!

Why do you think that “going to the trainer” is seen as a punishment?